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Discover Benefits Of The Paleo Diet, Paleo Diet Basics, Paleo Friendly Desserts, Paleo Diet Food Lists


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“I think there are a lot of positives about it,” Holley says. “It cuts out a lot of processed foods just naturally, like processed grains or added sugar through soft drinks or juice.” And because the diet promotes eating anti-inflammatory foods — like fruits, vegetables, and unsaturated fats in nuts and certain oils — your health could benefit, Holley explains. Cutting out processed foods and sugar will also help lower your risk of certain diseases, like type 2 diabetes and certain cancers, she says. (6)
Gluten is a protein found in things like rye, wheat, and barley. It’s now being said that much of our population may be gluten-intolerant (hence all the new “gluten-free!” items popping up everywhere). Over time, those who are gluten intolerant can develop a dismal array of medical conditions from consuming gluten: dermatitis, joint pain, reproductive problems, acid reflux, and more.[4]
Sugar is almost always manufactured and should be avoided on the paleo diet. This means you’ll need to cut out the delicious but destructive sweets and sugars that are standard in the Standard American Diet. The rule of thumb here is: if it contains a ton of sugar, it’s probably not on the paleo diet friendly. That said, here’s a specific lists of sweets that are not on the paleo diet food list. You might want to take a moment to say goodbye to them before you start your paleo diet journey.
Why not take a load off and plan your next Monday through Friday with some of these Paleo dinners you can make in a single pot? Whether it’s a skillet, a Dutch oven, a roasting pan, or a wok, all you need to do is throw in the ingredients and let heat do the rest. You’ll have more time to take a walk, hit the gym, or even just sit outside now that the sunlight is lingering!
To get an idea of what that means, we turned to the experts, including Loren Cordain, PhD, a professor emeritus at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado, and the author of The Paleo Diet; Erin Holley, RD, of Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio; and Lona Sandon, PhD, RD, an assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.
4. Spread the fig filling across the middle of the rectangle. Use the parchment paper to fold the bottom third of the dough over the top of the fig filling. Peel back the paper and repeat with the top third of the dough, forming a long log. Use a sharp knife to cut the log into the desired amount of pieces. Space the pieces out on the parchment paper and place onto a baking sheet. Bake for 15-18 minutes, or until the edges are golden brown. Let cool for 20 minutes before serving. Store in an airtight container.