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Discover Benefits Of The Paleo Diet, Paleo Diet Basics, Paleo Friendly Desserts, Paleo Diet Food Lists


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For many people, switching over to Paleo isn’t easy. Due to the sudden drop-off in dietary carbohydrates, folks who are used to mainlining pasta and sugar often report that they feel terrible for the first couple of weeks after going Paleo. (Some call this the “Paleo flu.”) But if you can make it through this initial period of sluggishness (which can last two or three weeks), you’ll come through the other end feeling like a million bucks. Trust me. I’ve been there.
Guaranteed to be a fast favorite, this recipe plays on the sweet-savory match made in flavor heaven: pork + apples. Sautéed apples add a hint of sweetness and delightfully smooth texture to this hearty paleo pork dish. If you don't have access to Honeycrisp apples, use a pink lady, gala, or jazz apple instead. Dijon mustard counteracts the sweetness of the apple adding incredible depth of flavor that the whole family can enjoy.
Too many folks think the Paleo approach to eating is about deprivation, and that all we eat is ground beef with a side of steamed broccoli. “I can’t go Paleo – there’ll be nothing I can eat,” skeptics say. But what they mean is that they can’t conceive of Paleo food being anywhere near as scrumptious as their weekly meals at the local greasy spoon, or as satisfying as the crinkly bag of half-eaten fluorescent cheese poofs on the floor of their car. To get people to maintain a Paleo lifestyle, it’s important to show how the food that fuels them can be healthy and insanely good.
3. In a small bowl, whisk together the beef broth, coconut aminos, honey, and red pepper flakes. Pour the mixture over everything in the slow cooker. Stir to combine. Cover and cook on low heat for 9-11 hours. Remove the lemongrass stalk and place the ribs on a serving plate. Let the braising liquid sit for 5 minutes and skim any fat off the top. Pour about a cup of the liquid over the ribs. Top with sesame seeds and cilantro to serve.
This paleo soup is perfect for ushering in fall: It's hearty enough for the beginning of soup season, yet brothy and veggie-packed so that it doesn't feel too heavy. Pair it with a slaw or kale side salad for a light, satisfying dinner. This recipe is ideal for a weekend, when you can check on the slow cooker after just a few hours; though you won't be able to leave the soup unattended all day, this still offers the benefit of hands-free, fuss-free cooking.
Crunchy, creamy, and fruity layers come together in this quick and easy paleo dessert. Loaded with nutritious ingredients, this dessert also makes a good breakfast. For the coconut cream, skim the thick layer off the top of a can of full-fat coconut milk that has been refrigerated overnight. There may be leftover ingredients that don’t fit in the jar, which can be stored in the refrigerator and used for a parfait the next day.
Tender lamb combines with fresh veggies like kale and butternut squash to create the ultimate comforting winter stew. Richly spiced with coriander, cumin, and paprika, the secret ingredient is also a dash of cinnamon. The best part of this simple paleo recipe is that the majority of the cooking time is hands-off, leaving you time to focus on other things.
4. Meanwhile, melt the chocolate in a bowl in the microwave. Allow to cool slightly. Use a fork to dunk the patties into the chocolate, and then place them back on the baking sheet. If the chocolate is too thick, stir in a teaspoon or two of coconut oil to thin it out. Once all of the patties have been dipped in the chocolate, place the baking sheet back into the freezer for 15 minutes more. Serve cold or store in the freezer.
Whether you’re looking for a quick paleo breakfast, family-friendly dinner, guilt-free dessert or no fuss snack, these are the easy paleo recipes that you’ll keep coming back to again, and again, and again… From award-winning no bake paleo desserts to household favorite set-it-and-forget-it chicken crockpot meals, if its paleo-friendly, easy and ‘ermmahgerd’ delicious, you’ll find it here.
For the most part, my eats are “clean.” For me, that means generally following the rules of the Whole30®. The Whole30 is a nutritional reset that gets you back to a clean dietary slate: Eliminate all grains, legumes, dairy, sugar, and chemically processed vegetable and seed oils from your diet for a month. Once a baseline of health is established, slowly reintroduce some of these foods (like dairy, white rice, and dark chocolate—not hyper-processed junk foods!) one at a time to see where you sit on the spectrum of food tolerance. We all share the goal of finding a lifelong template for optimal nutrition and health, but you just might find that your template allows for a wider range of foods than mine.
Eat low to moderate amounts of fruits and nuts. Try to eat mostly fruits low in sugar and high in antioxidants like berries as well as nuts high in omega-3, low in omega-6 and low in total polyunsaturated fat like macadamia nuts. Consider cutting off fruits and nuts altogether if you have an autoimmune disease, digestive problems or are trying to lose weight faster.
My blog, cookbooks, cooking app, and podcast, are intended to help you translate the “rules of the road” into delicious, easy-to-prepare meals for you and your family. Here, you’ll see the way I eat on an everyday basis, and my recipes, too. In case you’re wondering, I cook entirely gluten- and soy-free, and steer clear of legumes and refined vegetable and seed oils.